AP United States History Fall 2019

Week 19

1/21-1/24

Wednesday-Friday  1/22-1/24

Sem1 Finals
journals due


Week 18
1/13-1/17

Immigration and Migration

The Gilded Age



Thursday 1/16

1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal
C18The Urban Landscape p. 494-497
Liesure in Consumer Society502-508

2. Myap Unit 6 1865-1898 now open for review


Wednesday 1/15

1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal
C18The Urban Landscape p. 494-497
The Rise of Mass Consumption p. 500-502

2. Myap Unit 6 1865-1898 now open for review


Tuesday 1/14

1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal
C18The Urban Landscape p. 494-497
Strains of Urban Life p. 497-500

2. Myap Unit 6 1865-1898 now open for review

C18 Key Terms

1. American Protective Association
2. Social Gospel Movement
3. Urbanization
4. Immigration
5. Machine Politics
6. Tammany Hall
7. Boss Tweed
8. Jim Crow
9. Ida B. Wells
10. Booker T. Washington
11. W.E.B. DuBuios
12. The “Gospel of Wealth”
13. Fredrick Law Olmstead
14. Popular Entertainment
15. Jacob Riis
16. How the Other Half Lives
17. Tenements
18. Jane Adam & Settlement House movement
19. Mass Circulation Newspapers
20. William Randolph Hearst
21. Joseph Pulitzer
22. Muscular Christianity

Guided Questions

1. What were some of the problems that resulted from rapid urbanization, and how did urban governments respond to these problems?

2. What was the relationship between immigration and ­urbanization in the late nineteenth century?

3. Examine and evaluate the urban political machines and political bosses of the late nineteenth century.

4. How did the rise of mass consumption affect leisure and entertainment?

        a. sports,

        b. entertainment

        c. consumerism

       d. popular journalism.



Monday 1/13

1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal
C17 Industrial Workers in the New Economy p.475-483

1. Read and Review C18 webpage

C 18 The Age of the City

     a. Summary

     b. Timeline

     c. Themes 

     d. Digital History Overview and Summary


1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal
C18 The Urbanization of America p. 487-485

3. Myap Unit 6 1865-1898 now open for review

Week 17
1/6-1/10

Thursday 1/9

1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal
Capitalism and Its Critics p. 467-475

Wednesday 1/8


Between the Civil War and World War I, the modern American economy emerged. A national transportation and communication network was created, the corporation became the dominant form of business organization, and a managerial revolution transformed business operations. By the beginning of the 20th century, per capita income and industrial production in the United States exceeded that of any other country except Britain. Unlike the pre-Civil War economy, this new one was dependent on raw materials from around the world and it sold goods in global markets. Business organization expanded in size and scale. There was an unparalleled increase in factory production, mechanization, and business consolidation. By the beginning of the 20th century, the major sectors of the nation's economy--banking, manufacturing, meat packing, oil refining, railroads, and steel--were dominated by a small number of giant corporations. Around the turn of the 20th century, mass immigration from eastern and southern Europe dramatically altered the population's ethnic and religious composition. Unlike earlier immigrants, who had come from Britain, Canada, Germany, Ireland, and Scandinavia, the new immigrants came increasingly from Hungary, Italy, Poland, and Russia. The newcomers were often Catholic or Jewish and two-thirds of them settled in cities. In this chapter you will learn about the new immigrants and the anti-immigrant reaction.


1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal
Sources of Industrial Growth p. 459-467

C17 Key Terms

1. Bessemer Process                                      

2. Henry Ford                             

3. Thomas Edison

4. Taylorism                                                   

5. Andrew Carnegie                    

6. Fordism

7. Social Darwinism                                     
8. Laissez-Faire                            
9. Anarchists

10. JD Rockefeller                                          

11. Gospel of Wealth                      

12. Sherman Anti Trust Act 1890

13. Monopoly ,Trusts, Pools, Cartels           
14. Vertical Integration                  
15. Haymarket Square Riot         
16. Horizontal Integration                              
17. Socialist Party of American   
18. Eugene V. Debs

19. Railroad Strike of 1877                            

20. Wright Brothers                                                     

21. Pullman Strike                                          
22. Homestead Strike

23. Samuel Gompers                                      

24. American Federation of Labor                                                       

25. Henry George

Guiding Questions

1. What factors drove America's industrial expansion in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries?

2. Who were some of the businessmen and industrial titans of the late nineteenth century, and what did they contribute to America's industrial growth? 3.What changes took place in corporate organization in the late nineteenth century, and how did these changes affect the nation's economy?

4. Who were the critics of America's new industrial economy, what were their criticisms, and what solutions did they propose?

5. How did Social Darwinism attempt to justify the social consequences of industrial capitalism?



Tuesday 1/7


In 1860, most Americans considered the Great Plains the Great American Desert. Settlement west of Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana averaged just 1 person per square mile. The only parts of the Far West that were highly settled were California and Texas. Between 1865 and the 1890s, however, Americans settled 430 million acres in the Far West--more land than during the preceding 250 years of American history. By 1893, the Census Bureau was able to claim that the entire western frontier was now occupied. The discovery of gold, silver, and other precious minerals in California in 1849, in Nevada and Colorado in the 1850s, in Idaho and Montana in 1860s, and South Dakota in the 1870s sparked an influx of prospectors and miners. The expansion of railroads and the invention of barbed wire and improvements in windmills and pumps attracted ranchers and farmers to the Great Plains in the 1860s and 1870s. This chapter examines the forces that drove Americans westward; the kinds of lives they established in the Far West; and the rise of the "West of the imagination," the popular myths that continue to exert a powerful hold on mass culture. The 250,000 Native Americans who lived on the Great Plains were confined onto reservations through renegotiation of treaties and 30 years of war. This chapter also examines the consequences of America's westward movement for Native Americans.


1. Read and Review C16 webpage


C16 The Conquest of the Far West 1860-1890

     a. Summary

     b. Timeline

     c. Themes 

     d. Digital History Overview and Summary


C16 Connecting Concepts p.459


2. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal

The Dispersal of the Tribes p. 447--453

The Rise and Decline of the Western Farmer  p. 453-456


C16 Key Terms


1. Plains Indians

2. Sitting Bull 

3. Crazy Horse   

4. Lakota Sioux                           

5. Chief Joseph

6. Nez Pierce      

7. Chinese Exclusion Act 1882

8. “Concentration” policy                       

9. Reservation System

10. Sand Creek Massacre

11. Battle of Little Bighorn

12. George A. Custer  

13. Dawes Severalty Act 1887  
14. Indian Schools                    
15. Frederick Jackson Turner's Frontier Thesis 1893
16. Wounded Knee 1890

Long Essay Exam Tips

In the past there have been few free-response questions about the West itself as a topic. Think of the West in the context of broader issues such as women, the economy, and Native Americans. Keep in mind that what happened in the West was not isolated from what was going on in the East. The economy, social developments, intellectual currents, and politics developed with regional distinctions, but reflected national characteristics. Be familiar with Turner's Frontier Thesis, which is one of the most influential historical essays ever written about America. It resonates with our self-image, but also be aware of its inaccuracies. This chapter's coverage of Native Americans, their resistance to white settlement, and shifting federal policy toward the tribes is important. Compare this to relations before the Civil War and relations during the colonial period.

 


Between the Civil War and World War I, the modern American economy emerged. A national transportation and communication network was created, the corporation became the dominant form of business organization, and a managerial revolution transformed business operations. By the beginning of the 20th century, per capita income and industrial production in the United States exceeded that of any other country except Britain. Unlike the pre-Civil War economy, this new one was dependent on raw materials from around the world and it sold goods in global markets. Business organization expanded in size and scale. There was an unparalleled increase in factory production, mechanization, and business consolidation. By the beginning of the 20th century, the major sectors of the nation's economy--banking, manufacturing, meat packing, oil refining, railroads, and steel--were dominated by a small number of giant corporations. Around the turn of the 20th century, mass immigration from eastern and southern Europe dramatically altered the population's ethnic and religious composition. Unlike earlier immigrants, who had come from Britain, Canada, Germany, Ireland, and Scandinavia, the new immigrants came increasingly from Hungary, Italy, Poland, and Russia. The newcomers were often Catholic or Jewish and two-thirds of them settled in cities. In this chapter you will learn about the new immigrants and the anti-immigrant reaction.


3. Read and Review C17 webpage


C17 Industrial Supremacy 1860-1900

     a. Summary

     b. Timeline

     c. Themes 

     d. Digital History Overview and Summary


C17 Connecting Concepts p.458


C17 Key Terms

1. Bessemer Process                                      

2. Henry Ford                             

3. Thomas Edison

4. Taylorism                                                   

5. Andrew Carnegie                    

6. Fordism

7. Social Darwinism                                     
8. Laissez-Faire                            
9. Anarchists

10. JD Rockefeller                                          

11. Gospel of Wealth                      

12. Sherman Anti Trust Act 1890

13. Monopoly ,Trusts, Pools, Cartels           
14. Vertical Integration                  
15. Haymarket Square Riot         
16. Horizontal Integration                              
17. Socialist Party of American   
18. Eugene V. Debs

19. Railroad Strike of 1877                            

20. Wright Brothers                                                     

21. Pullman Strike                                          
22. Homestead Strike

23. Samuel Gompers                                      

24. American Federation of Labor                                                       

25. Henry George

Guiding Questions

1. What factors drove America's industrial expansion in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries?

2. Who were some of the businessmen and industrial titans of the late nineteenth century, and what did they contribute to America's industrial growth? 3.What changes took place in corporate organization in the late nineteenth century, and how did these changes affect the nation's economy?

4. Who were the critics of America's new industrial economy, what were their criticisms, and what solutions did they propose?

5. How did Social Darwinism attempt to justify the social consequences of industrial capitalism?



Monday 1/6

1. SAQ-Reconstruction

2. Quiz
Ch. 14 Civil War
Ch. 15 Reconstruction and the New South

Quiz Review

C14 Civil War

C15 Reconstruction


Week 16
12/16-20

Articles

Thursday 12/19

1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal
The New South p.418-428
*Tenants and Sharecroppers
*African Americans in the New South
*The Birth of Jim Crow

2. Presidential and Congressional Reconstruction (google classroom)

3. Myap Unit 5 multiple choice
* (extension) please complete by January 6th

4. Intro and Thesis
LEQ : To what extent did the Civil War constitute a revolution in American society? due Jan 6th



Wednesday 12/18

1. Presidential and Congressional Reconstruction (google classroom)

2. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal
The Abandonment of Reconstruction p. 414-418

3. Myap Unit 5 due Thursday


Tuesday 12/17

1. Presidential and Congressional Reconstruction (google classroom)

2. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal
The South in Reconstruction p. 407-412

3. Myap Unit 5 due Thursday

Monday 12/16

1. Read and Review C15 webpage

C 15 Reconstruction 1865-1877

     a. Summary

     b. Timeline

     c. Themes 

     d. Digital History Overview and Summary


C15 Connecting Concepts p.400


2. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal

The Problems of Peace Making p. 400-404

Radical Reconstruction p. 404-407


3. Presidential and Congressional Reconstruction outline (google classroom) due Thursday night


4. Myap Unit 5 due Thursday


5. LEQ : To what extent did the Civil War constitute a revolution in American society? due Jan 6th


Week 15
12/9-13

Thursday 12/12

Articles
Economic Impact of Civil War

The Civil War


1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal

The Course of Battle

1863: Year of Decision p.392-394

The Last Stage. 1864-65 p. 394-397


2. Civil War webquest



Wednesday 12/11

1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal

The Mobilization of the South

Economic and Social Effects of the War p. 380-381


Strategy and Diplomacy p.381-384

The Commanders

The Role of Sea Power

Europe and the Disunited States



Tuesday 12/10

1. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal

The Mobilization of the North p.368-377


Monday 12/9

The war claimed the lives of over 600,000 men and decided the troubling questions that had dogged America in the decades leading up to the war. Hamilton's vision for America would prevail, and America's future lay in commerce and industry. The war also settled two other important questions. American slavery was ended, although trials for African Americans were far from over. And the nature of federalism was decided-the federal government was supreme.


• Although there are no specific questions on military history in the multiple-choice section, battles and strategies can be important reference points for changes in politics, economics, and society. For example, the Union "victory" at Antietam gave Lincoln an opportunity to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.


• Wars are almost always instigators of social reform; the Civil War was no exception. Note its effect on minorities, especially African Americans, women, and immigrants.


• The Civil War is a good time to pay particular attention to presidential leadership. Lincoln expanded the powers of his office and of the federal government to confront the threat to the United States. Note both the military and political consequences of his actions during the Civil War.


1. Read and Review C14 webpage

C 14 The Civil War 1861-1865 

     a. Summary

     b. Timeline

     c. Themes 

     d. Digital History Overview and Summary


C14  Connecting Concepts p. 365


2. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal

The Secessionist Crisis p. 365-368


3. SAQ google classroom


Key Terms

1. Fort Sumter
2. Anaconda Plan
3. border states
4. contraband
5. George B. McClellan
6. Robert E. Lee
7. Emancipation Proclamation
8. Battle of Antietam
9. Battle of Gettysburg
10. Battle of Vicksburg
11. NYC draft riots
12. Sherman’s March
13. The Election of 1864
14. Copperhead Democrats
15. Appomatox Court House
16. Ullysses Grant
17. Clara Barton
18. 54th Massachusetts

Guiding Questions

1. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the North and the South, and explain the factors that led to northern victory and southern defeat. 

2. Discuss Abraham Lincoln’s and Congress’s approach to the slavery question during the course of the Civil War and explain the impact of those decisions on the Union and its war effort. 

3. Explain Grant’s strategy in the final years of the Civil War, and describe the battles that enabled him to achieve northern victory. 

4. Discuss the political, economic, and human costs of the Civil War,



Week 14
12/2-6

Thursday 12/5

1. Prepare for DBQ: The Coming of the Civil War (written Friday in-class)
  • You may bring your revised introduction and thesis
  • Outlines and annotated documents are acceptable

2. For those who were not in class today review 

3. All students should view

4. Have a clear understanding of the rubric and how your DBQ will be graded.

Wednesday 12/4

1. Introduction and Thesis statement 
Historical Contextualization and defensible claim (2pts.)

This will be typed and brought to class tomorrow morning (6-8 sentences)

Monday 12/2

1. Read and Review C13 webpage

C 13 The Impending Crisis 

     a. Summary

     b. Timeline

     c. Themes 

     d. Digital History Overview and Summary


C13  Connecting Concepts p. 340


2. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal

C13 The Impending Crisis

The Sectional Debate 351-354

The Crisis of the 1850s 354-361


Key Terms

1.Frederick Douglas
2.Free Soil Party
3.Wilmot Proviso
4.Compromise of 18509.Fugitive Slave Act
5.Uncle Tom’s Cabin
6.Stephen Douglas
7.popular sovereignty
8.Kansas-Nebraska Act
9.Bleeding Kansas
10.Charles Sumner
11.Republican Party
12.Scott v. Sandford
13.John Brown
14.election of 1860
15.secession


Guiding Questions

Guiding Questions and key terms are a way to organize the information from Chapter 13. Though they are not due, you are expected to understand them and be able to write to these prompts in the future.


1. What was the Compromise of 1850? How was it passed? How did the Compromise of 1850 differ from the Missouri Compromise? (p.374-376)

 

2.      Explain the re-emergence of sectional tension between 1850 and 1854, dealing specifically with: (p. 376-378)

         a.         the Fugitive Slave Act,

         b.         Uncle Tom’s Cabin,

         c.         the Underground Railroad

 

3.      Explain the Supreme Court’s decision in Dred Scott v. Sanford, and explain the impact of the decision on

         northern and southern public opinion.

 

4.      What were the goals of John Brown's raid, and why did it have such an impact on the South?

 

5.      What was the Republican platform in 1860? To what specific political groups were the Republicans trying to 

          appeal, and how did this platform propose to appeal to them? What was the outcome of this election and its

          impact on the future of the country?