AP United States History Quarter 3 2021
1/25-4/9

End of Quarter 3 
4/5-4/9



Friday Morning Office Hours AP Review 8:50-9:30 (I will notify you with the zoom codes via Remind the night before)
4/23
4/30
5/7
5/15
__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Period 9 MyAP MC 


End od Quarter Exam 4/8 C27-31


1970-2000

The Past Three Decades: Years of Crisis - Years of Triumph. This period examines the impact of the collapse of Communism on international stability; the resurgence of the American economy during the 1990s; and the presidencies of Ronald Regan, George Bush and Bill Clinton.


Watergate
Crisis of Political Leadership
Restraining the Imperial Presidency
New Style Presidents
Wrenching Economic Transformations
The Age of Inflation
Oil Embargo
Foreign Competition
Whipping Stagflation
A New American Role in the World
Détente
Foreign Policy Triumphs
No Islands of Stability
The Reagan Revolution
The Gipper
Reaganomics
The Celebration of Wealth
The Reagan Doctrine
A Remarkable Ideological Turnaround
The Reagan Revolution in Perspective
The First Bush Presidency
Collapse of Communism
The Persian Gulf War
The Clinton Presidency
Entering a New Century 

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

The Last Thirty Years

1970-2000


Nixon 1968-1974


Silent Majority

Earth Day

Environmental Protection Agency

OPEC

Oil Embargo and Energy Crisis

Stagflation

New Federalism

Watergate Scandal

Saturday Night Massacre

Roe v. Wade

Regents of University of California v. Bakke

ERA Amendment

Secret Bombing of Cambodia

Pentagon Papers

War Powers Act

26th Amendment

Khmer Rouge

Vietnamization

Paris Peace Accords

Ping Pong Diplomacy

Shuttle Diplomacy

Détente

ABM Treaty

Salt I

 

Ford 1974-1976


Pardon of Nixon

Fall of Saigon

 

Carter 1976-1980


Camp David Accords

Panama Treaty

Iranian Hostage Crisis

Three Mile Island

Soviet Invasion of Afghanistan

Boycott of Summer Olympics in Moscow

 

Reagan 1980-1988


“The Great Communicator”

Jerry Farwell

Moral Majority

Reaganomics

Supply side economic

Trickle Down Economics

Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Star Wars

Iran Contra Affair

Fall of Berlin Wall 1989

Geraldine Ferraro

Reagan Assassination Attempt

 

 _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


Week 9
3/22-3/26
Period 8 1945-1980 (Chapters 27-31)

Register this afternoon for Tonights Unit 2 Colonial America Review

Period 8 Review

AP College Board Period 8 (1945-1980)

Khan Academy Period 8 Origins of the Cold War

Khan Academy Period 8 Continuity and Change in a Post War World


Articles
Memories of 1968: Chaos in Black and White

Homework
MyAP Period 8 due Thursday 3/25

Read and Take Notes
C29 Civil Right, Vietnam and The Ordeal of Liberalism 1960s p. 781-805
C30 The Crisis of Authority p. 807-834

C30 The Crisis of Authority 1964-1975


1. American Indian Movement (AIM)                    

2. Betty Friedan                        

3. César Chávez

4. Counterculture                       

5. Free Speech Movement

6. George McGovern                                                   

7. Gerald Ford                           

8. Henry Kissinger

9. New Left                                                                      

10. Nixon Doctrine                      

11. OPEC

12. Rachel Carson                                                         

13. Roe v. Wade                              

14. “Silent majority”

15. Spiro Agnew                                                                

16. Stagflation                       

17. Stonewall riot

18. Vietnamization                                                          

19. Watergate                              

20. Weathermen

21. Wounded Knee

22. Students for a Democratic Society (SDS)

23. National Organization for Women (NOW)

 
C29 Key Terms 1960s


1. Bay of Pigs                                                                  

2. Black Power                          

3. Community Action Program

4. Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)              

5. Cuban missile crisis             

6. Dien Bien Phu

7. Freedom rides                                                             

8. Freedom summer                    

9. George Wallace

10. The Great Society                                                             

11. Ho Chi Minh                           

12. Immigration Act of 1965                                      

13. John Kennedy                         

14. Malcolm X

15. March on Washington                                            

16. Medicaid                                   

17. Medicare

18. New Frontier                                                             

19. Ngo Dinh Diem                      

20. Richard Nixon

21. Robert Kennedy                                                      

22. Tet offensive                          

23. Viet Cong

24. Gulf of Tonkin Resolution                  

25. Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Week 8
3/15-3/21
Period 8 1945-1980 (Chapters 27-31)

Period 8 Review

AP College Board Period 8 (1945-1980)

Khan Academy Period 8 Origins of the Cold War

Khan Academy Period 8 Continuity and Change in a Post War World


Articles
Read and Take Notes
C28 The Affluent Society 1950s p. 754-779
C29 Civil Right, Vietnam and The Ordeal of Liberalism 1960s p. 781-805

C29 Key Terms 1960s


1. Bay of Pigs                                                                  

2. Black Power                          

3. Community Action Program

4. Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)              

5. Cuban missile crisis             

6. Dien Bien Phu

7. Freedom rides                                                             

8. Freedom summer                    

9. George Wallace

10. The Great Society                                                             

11. Ho Chi Minh                           

12. Immigration Act of 1965                                      

13. John Kennedy                         

14. Malcolm X

15. March on Washington                                            

16. Medicaid                                   

17. Medicare

18. New Frontier                                                             

19. Ngo Dinh Diem                      

20. Richard Nixon

21. Robert Kennedy                                                      

22. Tet offensive                          

23. Viet Cong

24. Gulf of Tonkin Resolution                  

25. Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)


1. SAQ #1 due 3/16

“That is what happened. When, right after the war, the American public, war-weary, seemed to favor demobilization and disarmament, the Truman administration (Roosevelt had died in April 1945) worked to create an atmosphere of crisis and cold war. True, the rivalry with the Soviet Union was real-that country had come out of the war with its economy wrecked and 20 million people dead, but was making an astounding comeback, rebuilding its industry, regaining military strength. The Truman administration, however, presented the Soviet Union as not just a rival but an immediate threat. In a series of moves abroad and at home, it established a climate of fear - a hysteria about Communism-which would steeply escalate the military budget and stimulate the economy with war-related orders. This combination of policies would permit more aggressive actions abroad, more repressive actions at home.” 

     A People’s History of the United States, Howard Zinn, 1980


“Shaking off the shortsightedness of Roosevelt and other policy makers, by 1946 a few advisers in the Truman administration had recognized the dangers posed by an expansionist Soviet Union. Truman himself required more convincing. As late as 1945 the president had referred privately to Stalin as “a fine man who wanted to do the right thing”—this about a dictator whose mass murders had exceeded those of Hitler and Tojo combined. Stalin was, said Truman, “an honest man who is easy to get along with—who arrives at sound decisions.” Well before the Missourian spoke those words, however, this “fine man” had started work on a Soviet atomic bomb—developing the weapon in the middle of the Battle of Stalingrad, when it was apparent it could not be ready in time to assist in the destruction of Germany. Stalin was already looking ahead to the postwar world and his new enemies, the United States and Great Britain.

     A Patriot’s History of the United States, Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen, 2004 


Answer a), b), and c). 


a). Briefly explain ONE difference between Zinn’s and Schweikart and Allen’s interpretations.

b). Provide ONE event or development NOT included in the excerpts and briefly explain how it supports Zinn’s interpretation. 

c). Provide ONE event or development NOT included in the excerpts and briefly explain how it supports Schweikart and Allen’s interpretation. 


C28 The Affluent Society  Key Terms 1950s


1. Brinksmanship

2. Dien Bien Phu                                          

3. 1st Indo-Chinese War 1945-1954  

4. Massive retaliation (MAD) 

5. Dwight D. Eisenhower

6. Eisenhower Doctrine

7. Suez Canal Crisis

8. John Foster Dulles

9. Rock n Roll                                     

10. Elvis Presley

11. Buddy Holly

12. Fidel Castro                              

13. “The Beats”                                            

14. J. D. Salinger  

15. Jack Kerouac  

16. Allen Ginsberg                       

17. Jackie Robinson

18. Jonas Salk
19. Interstate Highway Act 1956

20. Levittown    

21. Suburbia                                             

22. Brown v. Board of Education 1954

23. Martin Luther King Jr.

24. Southern Christian Leadership Coalition                 

25. Rosa Parks

26. Montgomery Alabama Bus Boycott

27. Little Rock Nine                             

28. Sputnik

29. NASA                                                   

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

Week 7
3/8-3/12
Period 8 1945-1980 (Chapters 27-31)


1. 1920s DDQ due 3/12 (Google Classroom and Turnitin)
Analyze how modernization and changing beliefs led to increased political and social conflicts during the 1920s.

C27 The Cold War Key Terms 1945-1960

               

1. Yalta Conference

2. Truman Doctrine 

3. The Fair Deal  

4. Dixiecrats Election of 1948                                                            

5. Containment 

6. George F. Kennan  

7. Marshall Plan    

8. Berlin Blockade 1948                 

9. McCarthyism  

10. House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) 

11. Hollywood 10                            

12. Alger Hiss  

13. Julius and Ethel Rosenberg               

14. Mao Zedong

15. Fall of China 1949

16. Soviets A-Bomb 1949

17. Korean War 1950-53

18. National Security Act1947

19. NSC-68 1950                                                                                                  

20. North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)  1949                                                                              
21. United Nations

22. Warsaw Pact  1955

23. Hydrogen Bomb     


C28 The Affluent Society  1950s Key Terms

                                                 

1. Brinksmanship

2. Dien Bien Phu                                          

3. 1st Indo-Chinese War 1945-1954  

4. Massive retaliation (MAD) 

5. Dwight D. Eisenhower

6. Eisenhower Doctrine

7. Suez Canal Crisis

8. John Foster Dulles

9. Rock n Roll                                     

10. Elvis Presley

11. Buddy Holly

12. Fidel Castro                              

13. “The Beats”                                            

14. J. D. Salinger  

15. Jack Kerouac  

16. Allen Ginsberg                       

17. Jackie Robinson

18. Jonas Salk
19. Interstate Highway Act 1956

20. Levittown    

21. Suburbia                                             

22. Brown v. Board of Education 1954

23. Martin Luther King Jr.

24. Southern Christian Leadership Coalition                 

25. Rosa Parks

26. Montgomery Alabama Bus Boycott

27. Little Rock Nine                             

28. Sputnik  

29. NASA                                                     

               

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________


The Decision to Drop the Atomic Bomb


In the fall of 1994, the Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., installed in its main hall the fuselage of the Enola Gay, the airplane that dropped the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare on Hiroshima in 1945. Originally, the airplane was to have been accompanied by an exhibit that would include discussions of the many popular and academic controversies over whether the United States should have used the bomb. But a powerful group of critics led by veterans' groups and aided by many members of Congress organized to demand that the exhibit be altered and that it reflect only the "official" explanation of the decision. In the end, the museum decided to mount no exhibit at all. The Enola Gay hangs in the Smithsonian today entirely without explanation for the millions of tourists who see it each year.

The furor that surrounded the Air and Space Museum installation reflects the passions that the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki continue to arouse among people around the world, and people in the United States and Japan in particular. It also reflects the continuing debate among historians about how to explain, and evaluate, President Truman's decision to use the atomic bomb in the war against Japan.

Truman himself, both at the time and in his 1955 memoirs, insisted that the decision was a simple and straightforward one. The alternative to using atomic weapons, he claimed, NAGASAKI SURVIVORS A Japanese woman and child look grimly at a photographer as they hold pieces of bread in the aftermath of the dropping of the second American atomic bomb this one on Nagasaki. 

American invasion of mainland Japan that might have cost as many as a million lives. Given that choice, he said, the decision was easy. "I regarded the bomb as a military weapon and never had any doubt that it should be used." Truman's explanation of his decision has been supported by the accounts of many of his contemporaries: by Secretary of War Henry Stimson, in his 1950 memoir, On Active Service in Peace and War; by Winston Churchill; by Truman's senior military advisers. It has also received considerable support from historians. Herbert Feis argued in The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II (1966) that Truman had made his decision on purely military grounds to ensure a speedy American victory. David McCullough, the author of a popular biography of Truman published in 1992, also accepted Truman's own account of his actions largely uncritically, as did Alonzo L. Hamby in Man of the People (1995), an important scholarly study of Truman. "One consideration weighed most heavily on Truman," Hamby concluded. "The longer the war lasted, the more Americans killed." Robert J. Donovan, author of an extensive history of the Truman presidency, Conflict and Crisis (1977), reached the same conclusion: "The simple reason Truman made the decision to drop the bomb was to end the war quickly and save lives."

Other scholars have strongly disagreed. As early as 1948, a British physicist, P. M. S. Blackett, wrote in Fear, War, and the Bomb that the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was "not so much the last military act of the second World War as the

first major operation of the cold diplomatic war with Russia." The most important critic of Truman's decision is the historian Gar Alperovitz, the author of two influential books on the subject: Atomic Diplomacy: Hiroshima and Potsdam (1965) and The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture of an American Myth (1995). Alperovitz dismisses the argument that the bomb was used to shorten the war and save lives. Japan was likely to have surrendered soon even if the bomb had not been used, he claims; large numbers of American lives were not at stake in the decision. Instead, he argues, the United States used the bomb less to influence Japan than to intimidate the Soviet Union. Truman made his decision to bomb Hiroshima in the immediate aftermath of a discouraging meeting with Stalin at Potsdam. He was heavily influenced, therefore, by his belief that America needed a new way to force Stalin to change his behavior, that, as Alperovitz has argued, "the bomb would make Russia more manageable in Europe."

Martin J. Sherwin, in A World Destroyed (1975), is more restrained in his criticism of American policymakers. But he too argues that a rapidly growing awareness of the danger Stalin posed to the peace made leaders aware that atomic weapons and their effective use could help strengthen the American hand in the nation's critical relationship with the Soviet Union. Truman, Sherwin said, "increasingly came to believe that America's possession of the atomic bomb would, by itself, convince Stalin to be more cooperative."

John W. Dower's War Without Mercy (1986) contributed, by implication at least, to another controversial explanation of the American decision: racism. Throughout World War II, most Americans considered the Germans and the Italians to be military and political adversaries. They looked at the Japanese very differently: as members of a very different and almost bestial race. They were, many Americans came to believe, almost a subhuman species. And while Dower himself stops short of saying so, other historians have suggested that this racialized image of Japan contributed to American willingness to drop atomic bombs on Japanese cities. Even many of Truman's harshest critics, however, note that it is, as Alperovitz has written, "all but impossible to find specific evidence that racism was an important factor in the decision to attack Hiroshima and Nagasaki."

The debate over the decision to drop the atomic bomb is an unusually emotional one driven in part by the tremendous moral questions that the destruction of so many lives raises and it has inspired bitter professional and personal attacks on advocates of almost every position. It illustrates clearly how history has often been, and remains, a powerful force in the way societies define their politics, their values, and their character.

"Hiroshima: Was it Necessary?" by Doug Long

The Decision (Nagasaki Exploratorium)



Week 6

The Great Depression and World War II

World War II on the Home Front


Read and Take Notes
C25 The Global Crisis 1920-1939 p. 686-702 
C26 America in a World War 1941-1945 p. 704-730

1. C23-26 Assessment 3/8

2. C26 HTS 03/7


HTS C26

1. How did the war affect life on the home front, especially for Women, African Americans, Japanese Americans, Mexican American, Native Americans? Compare and contrast the impact of the war on the many ethnic, gender, and racial groups in America.

Discuss

a. African Americans

b. Native Americans

c. Mexican Americans

d. Japanese Americans.

e. Women


Debating the Past (American History p. 728)

2. The United States dropped two atomic bombs on Japan, one on Hiroshima and the second on Nagasaki. Was dropping the bomb on Hiroshima justifiable, what were the options, what was Truman's ultimate declaration? Do the reasons for dropping the bomb on Hiroshima apply equally to the bombing of Nagasaki?


C25 Key Terms


Washington Conference of 1921

1. Adolf Hitler 

2. Appeasement 

3. Munich Conference

4. Atlantic Charter

5. Winston Churchill

6. Benito Mussolini 

7. Facsism

8. Dawes Plan

9. Good Neighbor Policy 

10. Neutrality Acts

11. Hideki Tojo

12. Kellogg-Briand Pact 

13. Hitler Stalin Pact

14. Axis Powers

15. Committee to Defend America

16. America First Committee

17. Lend-lease Act 

18. Pearl Harbor 


C26 Key Terms


1. Braceros

2. “Rosie the Riveter” 

3. Dwight D. Eisenhower 

4. D-Day

5. Enola Gay 

6. Enrico Fermi

7. Robert Oppenhimer

8. Harry S. Truman 

9. Hiroshima & Nagasaki

10. The Holocaust 

11. Executive Order 9066

12. Korematsu v. U.S.

13. Manhattan Project 

14. Zoot suits

15. Double V Campaign

16. Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

17. A. Philip Randolph
18. Tehran Confrence
19. Potsdam Conference
20. V-E Day
21. V-J Day
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Week 5

Read and Take Notes
C23 The Great Depression p.639-659
C24 The New Deal p.661-684

1. C20-22 Assessment 2/23

2. DBQ Revision due Friday 2/26-no late submissions

HTS  due Sunday 2/28


1. How did President Hoover and his administration try to deal with the Depression? What was the result of those efforts? How did Hoover's political            

beliefs affect his attempt to deal with the economic crisis of the Depression?

 

2. Use your knowledge of FDR's New Deal to answer the questions below

Answer a, b, and c.

 

     a). For All of the areas below, explain how effective the New Deal was in achieving its goals. Be specific.

               Providing relief to the poverty stricken (relief)

               Stimulating the economy (recovery)

               Instituting economic reforms (reform)


     b). Provided Two pieces of historical evidence to prove its effectiveness.

 

     c). Choose ONE area and explain why New Deal programs were not as effective in achieving its goals as it was for the area you choose.

 

C23-24 The Great Depression and the The New Deal Key Terms


1. Herbert Hoover  

2. Hoovervilles                                           

3. The Bonus Army                         

4. Franklin Delano Roosevelt                            

5. The Dust Bowl                                                

6. The 1932 Election

7. The New Deal    (relief, recovery, reform)                                               

8. The First Hundred Days

9. Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA)  

10. National Recovery Administration (NRA) 

11. Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC)

12. Huey Long

13. The Second New Deal                                    

14. The National Labor Relations Act (The Wagner Act)

15. The Social Security Act                                  

16. Securities Exchange Commission (SEC)       

17. Glass-Steagall Act-Federal Deposit Insurance                                                             

18. Works Progress Administration (WPA)

19. Court Packing Scheme                                   

20. Dorthea Lange

21. Eleanor Roosevelt                                             

22. John Steinbeck

23. Tennessee  Valley Authority (TVA)   

          

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Week 4
2/16-2/21
Period 7 1890-1945 (Chapters 20-26)


Read and Take Notes
C22 The New Era 1920 -1929 p. 615-637

The 1920’s was the first decade to have a nickname: Roaring 20s" or "Jazz Age." It was a decade of prosperity and dissipation, and of jazz bands, bootleggers, raccoon coats, bathtub gin, flappers, flagpole sitters, bootleggers, and marathon dancers. It was, in the popular view, the Roaring 20s, when the younger generation rebelled against traditional taboos while their elders engaged in an orgy of speculation. But the 1920s was also a decade of bitter cultural conflicts, pitting religious liberals against fundamentalists, nativists against immigrants, and rural provincials against urban cosmopolitans. The 1920’s was a decade of major cultural conflicts as well as a period when many features of a modern consumer culture took root. In this chapter, you will learn about the clashes over alcohol, evolution, foreign immigration, and race, and also about the growth of cities, the rise of a consumer culture, and the revolution in morals and manners. 


1. MyAP period 6 multiple choice questions open (due 2/19)

1. HTS (due Sunday 2/21)

1. Discuss the emergence of the following during the 1920's

    a. Ku Klux Klan

    b. Nativists and immigration reform

    c. Religious fundamentalists and the Scopes Trial

 

2. Explain the characteristics of each of the following, and discuss the impact of popular culture on American society during the

1920s: 

     a. Movies and Sports

     b. The "New Negro" and the Harlem Renaissance

     c. Prohibition and the 18th Amendment

     d. The "New Woman"


3. C20-22 Assessment 2/23

C22 The New Era Key Terms

 

1. Warren G. Harding

2. The Red Scare  

3. Red Summer  

4. Prohibition and Speakeasies

5. St. Valentines Day Massacre

6. Al Capone                   

7. The Ku Klux Klan

8. Calvin Coolidge                                   

9. The Scopes Trial

10. Religious Fundamentalism

11. Herbert Hoover                                   

12. The Equal Rights Amendment          

13. The National Origins Act 1924

14. Consumerism
15. The Installment Plan                                      
16. Marcus Garvey                                  

17. “The New Negro” and the Harlem Renaisance

18. Hollywood 1920's

19. Popular Culture

20. The Jazz Singer                               

21. The Harlem Renaissance

22. Langston Hughes

23. Jazz 

24. Duke Ellington                                                    

25. The Great Migration

26. Babe Ruth                                             

27. The "New Woman" and The Flapper

28. Margret Sanger

29. Lost Generation

30. F. Scott Fitzgerald

31. Ernest Hemingway                                    

32. Sacoo-Vanveti Trial

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Week 3
2/8-2/14
Period 7 1890-1945 (Chapters 20-26)
 

Period 7 Review
Read and Take Notes
C20 The Progressives 1900-1920 p. 552-581
C21 America and the Great War 1914-1920 p. 583-612

Assignments Q3 Week 3

1. Gilded Age DBQ Essay (due 2/10 google classroom)

Essay Question:
From 1870 to 1900, corporations grew significantly in number, size, and influence in the United States. Analyze the impact of big business on the economy, politics and society and the responses of Americans to these changes.


2. MyAP period 6 multiple choice questions open (due 2/12 MyAP)

3. HTS C20-21 (due Monday 2/15 google classroom)

1). How did W. E. B. Du Bois's philosophy on race relations differ from that of Booker T. Washington?

2). Outline the domestic policies and legislation of the Roosevelt and Wilson administrations.

3). Discuss the social, economic, and political effects World War I had on the home front.

4). Why did the battle over ratification of the Treaty of Versailles come to an impasse? Why did the Senate ultimately reject the treaty? What was the significance of that rejection? 


C20  The Progressives Key Terms

1. Roosevelt's "Square Deal"

2. Triangle Shirtwaist Fire                                              

3. Election of 1912                               

4. Muckrakers                        

5. Bull Moose Party 1912

6. Walter Rauschenbusch                                               

7. 16th Amendment                        

8. Social Gospel                                                               

9. 17th Amendment                                    

10. National Women's Suffrage Association                   

11. 18th Amendment   

12. The Woman’s Christian Temperance Union            

13. 19th Amendment  

14. Jane Addams and Hull House                                    

15. Ida B. Wells                                                             

16. Upton Sinclair                                                  

17. John Muir                                                                    

18. Ida Tarbell                                                             

19. Woodrow Wilson     
20. Booker T. Washington                                               
21. The “Atlanta Compromise” Speech                                     

22. W.E.B.DuBois                                                            

23. NAACP                                                                    


C21 World War I Key Terms


1. Allies                                                 

2. Central Powers 

3. Triple Entente

4. Triple Alliance 

5. General John J. Pershing              

6. “Great Migration” 

7. Lusitania 

8. Zimmermann Telegram

9. Trench Warfare

10. Western Front

11. Bolshevik Revolution

12. Palmer Raids                                  

13. Red Scare                                      

14. Senator Henry Cabot Lodge           

15. The Fourteen Points 

16. Treaty of Versailles                              

17. Espionage and Sedition Acts
18. Schenck v. United States
19. A war to "Make the World Safe for Democracy"
20. League of Nations
21. War Guilt Clause
22. Reparations

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
C19 From Crisis to Empire 
The Agrarian Revolt p. 520-524
"A Cross of Gold" p. 527-531
Stirrings of Imperialism p. 531-538
War With Spain p. 538-545
The Republic as Empire p. 545-548


The Gilded Age

Mark Twain called the late 19th century the "Gilded Age." By this, he meant that the period was glittering on the surface but corrupt underneath. In the popular view, the late 19th century was a period of greed and guile: of rapacious Robber Barons, unscrupulous speculators, and corporate buccaneers, of shady business practices, scandal-plagued politics, and vulgar display. It is easy to caricature the Gilded Age as an era of corruption, conspicuous consumption, and unfettered capitalism. But it is more useful to think of this as modern America's formative period, when an agrarian society of small producers were transformed into an urban society dominated by industrial corporations. An era of intense partisanship, the Gilded Age was also an era of reform. The Civil Service Act sought to curb government corruption by requiring applicants for certain governmental jobs to take a competitive examination. The Interstate Commerce Act sought to end discrimination by railroads against small shippers and the Sherman Antitrust Act outlawed business monopolies. These were turbulent years that saw labor violence, rising racial tension, militancy among farmers, and discontent among the unemployed. Burdened by heavy debts and falling farm prices, many farmers joined the Populist Party, which called for an increase in the amount of money in circulation, government assistance to help farmers repay loans, tariff reductions, and a graduated income tax. The 1880s and 1890s were years of turbulence. Disputes erupted over labor relations, currency, tariffs, patronage, and railroads. The most momentous political conflict of the late 19th century was the farmers' revolt. Drought, plagues of grasshoppers, boll weevils, rising costs, falling prices, and high interest rates made it increasingly difficult to make a living as a farmer. Many farmers blamed railroad owners, grain elevator operators, land monopolists, commodity futures dealers, mortgage companies, merchants, bankers, and manufacturers of farm equipment for their plight. Farmers responded by organizing Granges, Farmers' Alliances, and the Populist Party. In the election of 1896, the Populists and the Democrats nominated William Jennings Bryan for president. Bryan’s decisive defeat inaugurated a period of Republican ascendancy, in which Republicans controlled the presidency for 24 of the next 32 years. 


Assignments Q3 Week 2

1. DBQ Document Analysis (due 2/3 google classroom)

2. SAQ American Empire 2/4

3. C17-19 Assessment 2/5

4. DBQ Essay (due 2/10 google classroom)

C19 Key Terms

1. Farmers Alliance

2. National Granges

3. Granger Laws

4. Munn v. Illinois

5. Wabash Cases

6. People's Party

7. Omaha Platform

8. William Jennings Bryan

9. Free Silver

10. "Cross of Gold" speech

11. 1896 election

12. William McKinley

13. "new Manifest Destiny"

14. American interventions in Mexico

15. The De Lome Letter

16. General Wyler's re-concentration policy

17. The U.S.S. Maine

18. Treaty of Paris 1898

19. The Spanish-American War

20. The Philippine–American War

21. Emilio Aguinaldo

21. Anti-Imperialist League

23. Open Door Policy

24. Annexation of Hawaii

25. Queen Liliuokalani

26. Alfred Thayher Mahan

27. Theodore Roosevelt

28. Rough Riders

29. Open Door Notes

30. Boxer Rebelliuon


_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Week 1 
1/25-1/31
Period 6 1865-1898
1. Read and Take Notes
C17 Industrial Supremacy p.459-483
C18 The Age of the City p.486-512

Articles

Howard Zinn People's History of the United States

Robber Barons and Rebels (paragraph 1-28)


C17 Industrial Supremacy p.459-483


Between the Civil War and World War I, the modern American economy emerged. A national transportation and communication network was created, the corporation became the dominant form of business organization, and a managerial revolution transformed business operations. By the beginning of the 20th century, per capita income and industrial production in the United States exceeded that of any other country except Britain. Unlike the pre-Civil War economy, this new one was dependent on raw materials from around the world and it sold goods in global markets. Business organization expanded in size and scale. There was an unparalleled increase in factory production, mechanization, and business consolidation. By the beginning of the 20th century, the major sectors of the nation's economy--banking, manufacturing, meat packing, oil refining, railroads, and steel--were dominated by a small number of giant corporations. Around the turn of the 20th century, mass immigration from eastern and southern Europe dramatically altered the population's ethnic and religious composition. Unlike earlier immigrants, who had come from Britain, Canada, Germany, Ireland, and Scandinavia, the new immigrants came increasingly from Hungary, Italy, Poland, and Russia. The newcomers were often Catholic or Jewish and two-thirds of them settled in cities. In this chapter you will learn about the new immigrants and the anti-immigrant reaction.


2. HTS due Sunday 1/31 (google classroom)


1. What factors drove America's industrial expansion in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries? 

2. Who were some of the businessmen and industrial titans of the late nineteenth century, and what did they contribute to America's industrial growth? 

3.What changes took place in corporate organization in the late nineteenth century, and how did these changes affect the nation's economy?

4. How did Social Darwinism attempt to justify the social consequences of industrial capitalism?


 C17 Key Terms


1. Bessemer Process                                       

2. Henry Ford                              

3. Thomas Edison 

4. Taylorism                                                    

5. Andrew Carnegie                     

6. Fordism

7. Social Darwinism                                      

8. Laissez-Faire                             

9. Anarchists

10. JD Rockefeller                                           

11. Gospel of Wealth                       

12. Sherman Anti Trust Act 1890

13. Monopoly ,Trusts, Pools, Cartels            

14. Vertical Integration                   

15. Haymarket Square Riot          

16. Horizontal Integration                               

17. Socialist Party of American    

18. Eugene V. Debs

19. Railroad Strike of 1877                             

20. Wright Brothers                                                      

21. Pullman Strike                                           

22. Homestead Strike 

23. Samuel Gompers                                       

24. American Federation of Labor                                                        

25. Henry George


C18 The Age of the City p.486-512


Around the turn of the twentieth century, mass immigration from eastern and southern Europe dramatically altered the population's ethnic and religious composition. Unlike earlier immigrants, who had come from Britain, Canada, Germany, Ireland, and Scandinavia, the “new immigrants” came increasingly from Hungary, Italy, Poland, and Russia. The newcomers were often Catholic or Jewish and two-thirds of them settled in cities. In this chapter you will learn about the new immigrants and the anti-immigrant reaction. Also in this chapter traces the changing nature of the American city in the late 19th century, the expansion of cities horizontally and vertically, the problems caused by urban growth, the depiction of cities in art and literature, and the emergence of new forms of urban entertainment.


3. HTS C18 due Sunday 1/31 (google classroom)

1. What were some of the problems that resulted from rapid urbanization in the late 19th century, and how did urban governments respond to these problems?

2. What was the relationship between immigration and ­urbanization in the late nineteenth century?

3. Discuss and explain the evolution and role urban political machines and political bosses of the late nineteenth century. What were the positive and negatives of these powerful political organizations that dominated city governments in large metropolises during the Gilded Age?


C18 Key Terms


1. William Randolph Hearst

2. Joseph Pulitzer

3. Urbanization

4. Immigration

5. Machine Politics

6. Tammany Hall

7. Boss Tweed

8. Jim Crow

9. Ida B. Wells

10. Booker T. Washington

11. W.E.B. DuBuios

12. The “Gospel of Wealth”

13. Fredrick Law Olmstead

14. Popular Entertainment

15. Jacob Riis

16. How the Other Half Lives

17. Tenements

18. Jane Addams & the Settlement House movement

19. Mass Circulation Newspapers



_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Quater 1 2020

Period 4&5 Review

Week 9 Articles

1. Read and Take Notes

C15 Reconstruction and the New South p.400-428

AP Chapter 15 Study Guide


2. LEQ Period 4 Adjudication due Tuesday 10/26


3. C13-15 Assessment 10/29



Week 8 

10/19-10/23

Period 5 1844-1877


1. Read and Take Notes

C13 The Impending Crisis p. 339-361 

C14 Civil War p. 364-397

2. MyAP Unit 4 multiple choice questions due Wednesday 10/21

3. HTS C13 &14  due 10/25 (google classroom)


Week 7 

10/12-10/16


The Cultural Roots of Disunion


C12 In-Class Article

The First Age of Reform


College Board and Khan Academy Period 4 Review (1800-1848)

AP College Board (Jefferson and the Market Revolution)

AP College Board (Jacksonian Democracy and Reform)

Khan Academy Period 4 Review


Week 7 

10/12-10/16


1. Read and Take Notes

C9 Jacksonian America 1828-1844

C12 Antebellum Culture and Reform

2. SAQ 10/14 (google classroom)
3. Assessment (C7-10,12) 10/16

4. LEQ #3 10/18



Week 6

10/5-10/9


1. Read and Take Notes


C7 The Jeffersonian Era 1800-1824

AP Chapter 7 Study Guide


C8 Varieties of American Nationalism


C10 America's Economic Revolution
AP Chapter 10 Study Guide



Week 5

9/28-10/02


1. Read and Take Notes

The Constitution and the New Republic (1787-1800) p 159-178

AP Chapter 6 Study Guide


2. C6 SAQ  due 9/28 


3. LEQ #1 Revise 9/30

LEQ Adjudication Form


4. 
myap.collegeboard.org

multiple choice practice questions Unit #3 due 10/1


5. C4-6 Period 3 Assessment 10/2


6. LEQ #2 due 10/4 
Analyze the ways in which British imperial policies between 1763 and 1776 intensified colonials’ resistance to British rule and their commitment to republican values. (submitted to google classroom and turnitin.com)

7. Register for Turnitin.com

Period 1
Class ID-26681488
Enrollment Key-APUSH12020

Period 2
Class ID-26681552
Enrollment Key-APUSH22020

Period 3
Class ID-26681586
Enrollment Key-APUSH32020


Week 4 Supplemental Readings

The American Revolution: Radical or Conservative

How Revolutionary was the American Revolution


Week 4

9/21-9/25


1. Read and Take Notes
C4 Empire in Transition (1763-1776) p. 98-126

Chapter 4 Study Guide


C5 The American Revolution (1776-1783) 

Chapter 5 Study Guide

The United States p. 129-133

War and Society p. 143--149

The Search for a National Government p. 151-156


2. American Revolution (intro to the DBQ)  (google classroom) 9/22


3. C4 SAQ (google classroom) 9/23


4. C5 SAQ (google classroom) 9/25


Week 3

9/14-9/18

C3 Society and Culture in Provincial America (1690-1754)

Chapter 3 Study Guide


1. Read and Take Notes

C3 Society and Culture in Provincial America  p.66-96

C3 Review Historical Thinking Skills p.65

C3 Review Connecting Concepts p. 66


2. New England and Chesapeake Comparative analysis chart (1607-1700) due 9/16 Google Classroom

Thesis Statement and 1st paragraph of your essay written into your journal, to be shared in breakout rooms in class  Thursday 9/17


3. myap.collegeboard.org

multiple choice practice questions Unit 2  #1-18 due 9/17


4. C1-3 Assessment 9/18 open book/open notes


5. Long Essay Question due Sunday 9/20
College Board AP History Rubrics

APUSH LEQ Rubric 2020


Although New England and the Chesapeake Region Were Both Settled Largely by People of English Origin, by 1700 the Regions Had Evolved Into Two Distinct Societies. Why Did This Difference in Development Occur?


Week 2

9/7-9/13

Tuesday-Sunday

Chapter 2 Transplantations and Borderlands

Chapter 2 Study Guide


1. Read and Take Notes

C2 Transplantations and Borderlands p.35-63

C2 Review Historical Thinking Skills p.34

C2 Review Connecting Concepts p. 35


2. C1 Historical Thinking Skills (2 & 5 p.1) due 9/8 Google Classroom


3. C1 SAQ personal choice (4,5,or 6 p. 33) due 9/9 Google Classroom

Khan Academy SAQ Chapter 1

The Short Answer Question (notes)


4. myap.collegeboard.org

multiple choice practice questions Unit 1 #1-15 due 9/12


5. New England and the Chesapeake Comparison Chart due 9/16 Google Classroom


Week 1

8/31-9/6

Monday-Sunday 

Chapter 1 The Collision of Cultures

AP Chapter 1 Study Guide


1. Read American History preface p. XVII-XXIV


2. Read and Take Notes 

C1 The Collision of Cultures p.2-33

C1 Review Historical Thinking Skills p.1

C1 Review Connecting Concepts p. 2


3. Take practice Test Multiple Choice questions 1-3

Consider if you would be able to respond to any of the Short Answer Questions 4-6