Honors United States History Spring 2020

6/1-6/5


CNN Soundtracks: The Assassination of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King

There are moments in history that shape our lives, and there are songs that define those moments. The CNN Original Series Soundtracks: Songs that Defined History, from Executive Producer Dwayne Johnson, will explore the music that is tied to iconic Civil Rights movement, and the impact of that music on our society.


Final Assignments


1. Please submit Final Documentary Film Trailer through Google Classroom deadline 6/3 11:59 pm.

No need to upload it to YouTube if you are able to post it in Google Classroom. Some students may face technical problems uploading to YouTube because of copyright licenses with the music they may have chosen as their sound track. If you have uploaded to YouTube please email me a working link so I can view your work.


2. Research Paper submission instructions  deadline 6/3 11:59pm.

Turnitin.com (student resource hub)


Class ID: 25129900

Enrollment Key: uchshistory


3. The Century Series links and Guided Viewing Questions below due Friday June 5th


Guided Viewing Questions due June 5th (google classroom)


The first few years of the 1960s promised a greater, stronger and more unified America than ever. America, as the undisputed leader of the free world, straddled the globe like Colossus. But within a few years the optimism of the first years of the decade would vanish, only to be replaced by the uncertainty of a new and unfamiliar world, and the national mourning of a fallen leader. This episode covers the years 1960-1963, and examines the events of the era such as the lunch counter sit-ins at Greensboro, North Carolina, the Kennedy years, the Cuban Missile Crisis and America’s increasing involvement in Vietnam. The episode ends with the assassination of Kennedy and the loss of American innocence.

Guided Viewing Questions due June 5th (google classroom)

After the assassination of John F. Kennedy in November of 1963, America stood on the brink of domestic conflict and entrenched in the quagmire of the Vietnam War. The years 1963 through 1968 remain some of the most violent and destructive years of American history. This episode examines some of the major events of those turbulent years, including the murder of three civil rights workers in 1964, Freedom Summer, student protest and the Students for a Democratic Society, Lyndon Baines Johnson’s Great Society, the counterculture, the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy, and the 1968 Democratic convention.

Week 31

5/11-5/15


Final Project


1. Essential Question due 5/12 (google classroom)


Week 30

5/4-5/8


Please use this website and google classroom to complete the weekly objectives outlined in the schedule below. All of the assignments I have posted over the last 6 weeks are expected by the end of the school year.  Grading resumed April 27th, and updated grades of all your assignments are posted to March 13th.  Please check PowerSchool. Honors office hours will take place on Zoom  (P1) Mondays 10:00-11:00am, (P5) Fridays 10:00-11:00 pm and (P6) 1:00-2:00pm. I will  send you the ID and Password via Remind. The meetings are an opportunity to ask questions about content, to connect as a class, and review expectations. The day before  office hours please reflect. I want to start with your questions. All questions are great questions. We are family and we have each others back, we learn from each other. I look forward to seeing you.-Mr. B


Week 30 Schedule

5/4-5/8


The Origins of the Cold War 1945-1953


The mutual hostility between the United States and the Soviet Union grew out of ideological incompatibility and concrete actions stretching back to World War I and before. The alliance of convenience and necessity against Germany temporarily muted the tensions, but disagreement over the timing of the second front and antagonistic visions of postwar Europe pushed the two nations into a "cold war" only a few months after the victory over the Axis. The Cold War was marked by confrontation and the fear of potential military conflict. The United States vowed to contain communism by any means available. Meanwhile, the American people, exhausted from a decade and a half of depression and war, turned away from economic reform. They were worried about the alleged Soviet threat in Europe, especially after Russia exploded its own atomic bomb in 1949. They were dismayed by the communist victory in China and perplexed by the limited war in Korea. Many Americans latched onto charges of domestic communist subversion as an explanation for the nation’s inability to control world events. No one exploited this mood more effectively than Joseph McCarthy.


1. View of BOA (11:00-26:00 min.)

2. Read American Yawp C 25

  • I. Introduction
  • II. Political, Economic, and Military Dimensions
  • III. The Arms Buildup, the Space Race, and Technological Advancement
  • IV. The Cold War Red Scare, McCarthyism, and Liberal Anti-Communism
  • V. Decolonization and the Global Reach of the ‘American Century’
  • VI. Conclusion

  • 3. View PowerPoint Presentation

    The Early Cold War (1945-1961)


    3. Essential Question due 5/12 (google classroom)


    Analyze the reasons for the development of tensions between the Soviet Union and the United States. Discuss the origins of the Cold War and the policy of containment 1945-1953 with regards to significance of events that marked the early origins of the Cold War.


    • The Truman Doctrine 1947
    • The Marshal Plan 1947
    • Berlin Blockade 1948
    • Fall of China to the Communists 1949
    • North Atlantic Treaty Organization 1949
    • The Korean War



    Week 29 Schedule

    4/27-4/1


    1. The Century: America's Time. 1946-1952 The Best Years
    Demobilization after World War II meant difficult changes as the U.S., geared up for war, resumed a peacetime existence. This program describes America’s new status as a superpower, as the nation shouldered the responsibility for rebuilding Europe and Japan – and for containing Soviet ambitions. The challenge faced by veterans and spouses to become reacquainted after years of separation and hardship is highlighted.

    a. Guided Viewing Questions Posted on Google Classroom due 4/5

    2. The Century: America's Time. 1953-1960
    The post-war baby boom, suburban living, Marilyn Monroe, and Elvis epitomizes the contentment of the Eisenhower years. But these were also years marked by rabid McCarthyism, violent civil rights demonstrations, and a frightening escalation in the Cold War. This program probes the tension between these crosscurrents in American History.

    b. Guided Viewing Questions Posted on Google Classroom due 4/5


    Week 28 Schedule

    4/20-4/26


    The mutual hostility between the United States and the Soviet Union grew out of ideological incompatibility and concrete actions stretching back to World War I and before. The alliance of convenience and necessity against Germany temporarily muted the tensions, but disagreement over the timing of the second front and antagonistic visions of postwar Europe pushed the two nations into a "cold war" only a few months after the victory over the Axis. The Cold War was marked by confrontation and the fear of potential military conflict. The United States vowed to contain communism by any means available. Meanwhile, the American people, exhausted from a decade and a half of depression and war, turned away from economic reform. They were worried about the alleged Soviet threat in Europe, especially after Russia exploded its own atomic bomb in 1949. They were dismayed by the communist victory in China and perplexed by the limited war in Korea. Many Americans latched onto charges of domestic communist subversion as an explanation for the nation?s inability to control world events. No one exploited this mood more effectively than Joseph McCarthy.


    1. View of BOA (0:00-10:00 min.)
    World War II is fought to its bitter end in the Pacific and the world lives with the legacy of its final moment: the atomic bomb. 


    Assignment due 4/27


    The Decision to Drop the Atomic Bomb


    In the fall of 1994, the Air and Space Museum of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., installed in its main hall the fuselage of the Enola Gay, the airplane that dropped the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare on Hiroshima in 1945. Originally, the airplane was to have been accompanied by an exhibit that would include discussions of the many popular and academic controversies over whether the United States should have used the bomb. But a powerful group of critics led by veterans' groups and aided by many members of Congress organized to demand that the exhibit be altered and that it reflect only the "official" explanation of the decision. In the end, the museum decided to mount no exhibit at all. The Enola Gay hangs in the Smithsonian today entirely without explanation for the millions of tourists who see it each year.

    The furor that surrounded the Air and Space Museum installation reflects the passions that the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki continue to arouse among people around the world, and people in the United States and Japan in particular. It also reflects the continuing debate among historians about how to explain, and evaluate, President Truman's decision to use the atomic bomb in the war against Japan.

    Truman himself, both at the time and in his 1955 memoirs, insisted that the decision was a simple and straightforward one. The alternative to using atomic weapons, he claimed, NAGASAKI SURVIVORS A Japanese woman and child look grimly at a photographer as they hold pieces of bread in the aftermath of the dropping of the second American atomic bomb this one on Nagasaki. 

    American invasion of mainland Japan that might have cost as many as a million lives. Given that choice, he said, the decision was easy. "I regarded the bomb as a military weapon and never had any doubt that it should be used." Truman's explanation of his decision has been supported by the accounts of many of his contemporaries: by Secretary of War Henry Stimson, in his 1950 memoir, On Active Service in Peace and War; by Winston Churchill; by Truman's senior military advisers. It has also received considerable support from historians. Herbert Feis argued in The Atomic Bomb and the End of World War II (1966) that Truman had made his decision on purely military grounds to ensure a speedy American victory. David McCullough, the author of a popular biography of Truman published in 1992, also accepted Truman's own account of his actions largely uncritically, as did Alonzo L. Hamby in Man of the People (1995), an important scholarly study of Truman. "One consideration weighed most heavily on Truman," Hamby concluded. "The longer the war lasted, the more Americans killed." Robert J. Donovan, author of an extensive history of the Truman presidency, Conflict and Crisis (1977), reached the same conclusion: "The simple reason Truman made the decision to drop the bomb was to end the war quickly and save lives."

    Other scholars have strongly disagreed. As early as 1948, a British physicist, P. M. S. Blackett, wrote in Fear, War, and the Bomb that the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki was "not so much the last military act of the second World War as the first major operation of the cold diplomatic war with Russia." The most important critic of Truman's decision is the historian Gar Alperovitz, the author of two influential books on the subject: Atomic Diplomacy: Hiroshima and Potsdam (1965) and The Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb and the Architecture of an American Myth (1995). Alperovitz dismisses the argument that the bomb was used to shorten the war and save lives. Japan was likely to have surrendered soon even if the bomb had not been used, he claims; large numbers of American lives were not at stake in the decision. Instead, he argues, the United States used the bomb less to influence Japan than to intimidate the Soviet Union. Truman made his decision to bomb Hiroshima in the immediate aftermath of a discouraging meeting with Stalin at Potsdam. He was heavily influenced, therefore, by his belief that America needed a new way to force Stalin to change his behavior, that, as Alperovitz has argued, "the bomb would make Russia more manageable in Europe."

    Martin J. Sherwin, in A World Destroyed (1975), is more restrained in his criticism of American policymakers. But he too argues that a rapidly growing awareness of the danger Stalin posed to the peace made leaders aware that atomic weapons and their effective use could help strengthen the American hand in the nation's critical relationship with the Soviet Union. Truman, Sherwin said, "increasingly came to believe that America's possession of the atomic bomb would, by itself, convince Stalin to be more cooperative."

    John W. Dower's War Without Mercy (1986) contributed, by implication at least, to another controversial explanation of the American decision: racism. Throughout World War II, most Americans considered the Germans and the Italians to be military and political adversaries. They looked at the Japanese very differently: as members of a very different and almost bestial race. They were, many Americans came to believe, almost a subhuman species. And while Dower himself stops short of saying so, other historians have suggested that this racialized image of Japan contributed to American willingness to drop atomic bombs on Japanese cities. Even many of Truman's harshest critics, however, note that it is, as Alperovitz has written, "all but impossible to find specific evidence that racism was an important factor in the decision to attack Hiroshima and Nagasaki."

    The debate over the decision to drop the atomic bomb is an unusually emotional one driven in part by the tremendous moral questions that the destruction of so many lives raises and it has inspired bitter professional and personal attacks on advocates of almost every position. It illustrates clearly how history has often been, and remains, a powerful force in the way societies define their politics, their values, and their character.

    1. View YouTube Clips

    Truman's Ultimatum

    Explosions and Tragedy: Droping the Bomb on Hiroshima


    2. Read
    "Hiroshima: Was it Necessary?" by Doug Long

    3. Review comments posted

    The Decision (Nagasaki Exploratorium)


    4. Explore

    Hiroshima: Harry Truman on Trial - History News Network


    5.  Scroll down and click on link to reveal. Read and Review 


    6. Essential Questions (google Classroom due 4/27)

    1. Discuss the different perspectives on the U.S. decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II.
    2. Evaluate the moral implications of the decision. Was the decision justified?


    Schedule for the next week  4/13-4/17

    The Great Depression and World War 2 1932-1945 review


    1. View The Presidents 1932-1945


    2. View BOA's


    FDR and the Depression 
    Professor Brinkley continues his story of twentieth century presidents with a profile of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Brinkley paints a picture of America during the Depression and chronicles some of Roosevelt's programmatic and personal efforts to help the country through its worst economic crisis. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt is at FDR's side and, in many respects, ahead of him as the decade unfolds. 


    World War II 
    America is enveloped in total war, from mobilization on the home front to a scorching air war in Europe. Professor Miller's view of World War II is a personal essay on the morality of total war, and its effects on those who fought, died, and survived it, including members of his own family. 


    3. Review PowerPoints

    The Coming of the Depression ppt. 

    The Great Depression and The New Deal 1930s

    World War II: Battlefront (1939-1945)

    World War II: Homefront (1941-1945)


    4. Review John Green review Chapter 23-24


    5. View YouTube links


    • 7. If you haven't turned in C23 and C24 Essential questions this would be the week to complete those assignments.


    Schedule for the week of   3/20--3/27


    On September 1, 1939, World War II started when Germany invaded Poland. By November 1942, the Axis powers controlled territory from Norway to North Africa and from France to the Soviet Union. After defeating the Axis in North Africa in May 1941, the United States and its Allies invaded Sicily in July 1943 and forced Italy to surrender in September. On D-Day, June 6, 1944, the Allies landed in Northern France. In December, a German counteroffensive (the Battle of the Bulge) failed. Germany surrendered in May 1945. The United States entered the war following a surprise attack by Japan on the U.S. Pacific fleet in Hawaii. The United States and its Allies halted Japanese expansion at the Battle of Midway in June 1942 and in other campaigns in the South Pacific. From 1943 to August 1945, the Allies hopped from island to island across the Central Pacific and also battled the Japanese in China, Burma, and India. Japan agreed to surrender on August 14, 1945 after the United States dropped the first atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. World War II cost the United States a million causalities and nearly 400,000 deaths. World War II killed more people, involved more nations, and cost more money than any other war in history. Altogether, 70 million people served in the armed forces during the war, and 17 million combatants died. Civilian deaths were ever greater. At least 19 million Soviet civilians, 10 million Chinese, and 6 million European Jews lost their lives during the war. In both domestic and foreign affairs, its consequences were far-reaching. It ended the Depression, brought millions of married women into the workforce, initiated sweeping changes in the lives of the nation's minority groups, and dramatically expanded government's presence in American life. 


    1.  Read Gilder Lehrman Article

    World War II on the Home Front


    2. Read and take notes in your Analytical Journal

    I. Introduction
    II. Origins of the Pacific War
    III. Origins of the European War
    IV. The United States and the European War
    V. The United States and the Japanese War
    VI. Soldier's Experience
    VII. The War Time Economy
    VIII. Women and World War II
    IX. Race and World War II
    X. Toward a Post War World
    XI. Conclusion

    3. View BOA

    World War II 
    America is enveloped in total war, from mobilization on the home front to a scorching air war in Europe. Professor Miller's view of World War II is a personal essay on the morality of total war, and its effects on those who fought, died, and survived it, including members of his own family. 


    4. John Green review Chapter 23-24


    5. C24 Essential Question due Friday 2/27

    Directions: Cite relevant historical evidence in your response (historical vocabulary) and present your arguments clearly and logically. Each response a-e should be at least 5-6 sentences and address the entire question.


    During the four years of the war, American society and Americans underwent many changes. Specifically, African Americans, Native Americans, Japanese Americans, Mexican Americans, and women experienced many changes in their daily lives.


    1. How did the war affect life on the home front, especially for women, organized labor, and African Americans, Japanese Americans, Mexican American, Native Americans? Compare and contrast the impact of the war on the many ethnic, gender, and racial groups in America.

    Discuss

    a. African Americans

    b. Native Americans

    c. Mexican Americans

    d. Japanese Americans.

    e. Women


    Key Terms


    Douglas MacArthur               A. Philip Randolph              Harry Truman                      Admiral Chester Nimitz     

    “Rosie the Riveter”                Zoot-Suit Riots                     Winston Churchill                Joseph Stalin                    

    Tehran Conference                Holocaust                               Election of 1944                    Yalta Conference                    

    Japanese Internment             Operation Torch                    Korematsu v. US                  Operation Overlord                     

    Executive Oder 9066             Hiroshima and Nagasaki       D-Day                                    Code Talkers                                                 

    Braceros Program                 Test Shot Trinity                    Manhattan Project                V-E Day

    V-Jay Day                               General Dwight D. Eisenhower   



    Week 26 3/16-20

    Monday-Friday


    1. Read and Take Notes

    C23 The Great Depression 1929-1941

    V. The Lived Experience of the Great Depression

    VI. Migration and the Great Depression

    VII. Franklin Roosevelt and the New Deal

    X. Voices of Protest

    XI. The Second New Deal

    XIV. The Legacy of the New Deal


    View

    View

    C23 Essential  Questions due Friday 3/20 through google classroom
     
    1. What were the causes and factors that brought on the Great Depression

    2. Discuss the impact of the Depression on
    • Farmers
    • African Americans
    • Mexican-Americans
    • Women


    3. Explain how effective the New Deal was in achieving its goals. Use two pieces of historical evidence and discuss their significance for each area below in proving its effectiveness.

    • Providing relief to the poverty stricken (relief)
    • Stimulating the economy (recovery)
    • Instituting economic reforms (reform)

    Key Terms C23 The Great Depression and the The New Deal


    Herbert Hoover                                               The Bonus Army                         

    Franklin Delano Roosevelt                             The Stock Market Crash

    Tariff policy                                                     Bank failures

    Charitable Organizations                               Social Consequences of the Great Depression

    The Dust Bowl                                                 The Okies

    Mexican Immigrants                                       The 1932 Election

    The New Deal                                                   The First Hundred Days

    The Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA)     Civilian Conservation Corp (CCC)

    Huey Long                                                        Father Caughlin                                             

    The Second New Deal                                     The National Labor Relations Act (The Wagner Act)

    The Social Security Act                                   Race and the New Deal

    Securities Exchange Commission (SEC)        Glass-Steagall Act
    FDIC                                                                 Works Progress Administration (WPA)
    Court Packing Scheme                                    Dorthea Lange
    Elenor Roosevelt                                              John Steinbeck
    Tennessee  Valley Authority (TVA).               National Recovery Administration (NRA)